AI for Social Impact Seminar Series - Stevie Chancellor

Date: 

Monday, August 24, 2020, 1:00pm

Jon us from August 24 through December 7 at the AI for Social Impact Seminar Series. This seminar series will explore how artificial intelligence can contribute to solving social problems.

Artificial intelligence is poised to play an increasingly large role in societies across the world. Accordingly, there is a growing interest in ensuring that AI is used in a responsible and beneficial manner. A range of perspectives and contributions are needed, spanning the full spectrum from fundamental research to sustained deployments.

This seminar series will explore how artificial intelligence can contribute to solving social problems. For example, what role can AI play in promoting health, access to opportunity, and sustainable development? How can AI initiatives be deployed in an ethical, inclusive, and accountable manner?

Stevie Chancellor (Northwestern University)

 

Stevie ChancellorI build and critically examine human-centered algorithms for high-risk, dangerous health behaviors in online communities. I use digital trace data from millions of interactions on social media to understand and identify high-risk behaviors with machine learning and computational linguistics, combined with interdisciplinary insights from clinical psychology critical data studies.

Along the way, I explore how to conduct human-centered machine learning, an approach that deliberately refocuses technological design and implementation on the needs of humans, communities, and stakeholders. This includes tensions around rigor and robustness, construct validity, platform governance, and ethical issues within this research agenda. I deeply care about doing right by people and communities, and (recently) have been thinking about how to develop more ethical and compassionate research practices in data-driven approaches.

My domain of interest for these questions is online communities and mental health, and behaviors like pro-eating disorder, opioid addiction, and suicidal ideation.